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in copenhagen, the status of the car has changed. people are not used to having cars anymore. they sometimes use a car and go to a car sharing club or something. it is socially acceptable to cycle. 30, 40 years ago, you would maybe be seen as a loser if he came on a bicycle, -- if you came on a bicycle, but now it is for everybody. everyone is cycling. it is not, the former generation in the 60's, denmark, they could afford to buy a car and they really enjoyed it. they wanted to show it, and all trips they made or made by cars, the the new generation has a completely different view. >> i already gave my answer during my presentation. it is everything, especially if it is business or businessmen, it is money driven. show it is comparative in cost or it is less cost for business. because if you show that, there is a discussion. >> let me ask before i go to the next question, what in your experience the you believe was the most influential and excepting the different stages of the car and its role in the city? i am sure over 40 years, your attitudes toward the automobile have changed. what do you b
. and that's the weekly buzz. for more information about any of these events, visit us at sf negotiation tv daunts org. and check us out on facebook and twitter. while you're on the web watchess on youtube for >> as you all know, the german marshall fund vehicle very kind to provide us with this -- has been very kind to provided us with this opportunity to have four of their european experts in bicycle planning, bicycle implementation and bicycle programs and they are experts on all aspects of the bicycle. and here in san francisco, you know, we are at this point trying to after a hiatus of three years because of court-ordered injunctions trying to implement our bike plan. so we all a collective goal, i believe, to increase the environmental and nick sustainability of the world around us that we participate in and especially in san francisco, but we do have a special responsibility because this place provides us with the opportunity that most other places don't. the geometry and geography of san francisco is up that it is easier for us being in a city of short trips to veil ourselves to oth
to provide us with this -- has been very kind to provided us with this opportunity to have four of their european experts in bicycle planning, bicycle implementation and bicycle programs and they are experts on all aspects of the bicycle. and here in san francisco, you know, we are at this point trying to after a hiatus of three years because of court-ordered injunctions trying to implement our bike plan. so we all a collective goal, i believe, to increase the environmental and nick sustainability of the world around us that we participate in and especially in san francisco, but we do have a special responsibility because this place provides us with the opportunity that most other places don't. the geometry and geography of san francisco is up that it is easier for us being in a city of short trips to veil ourselves to other alternatives to the car. so when we want to reclaim the street and the public right-of-way and the public realm for people and basic human needs of access to the humanities that urban environments provide, we have a better shot at than, say, other places whe
, prepare for merger. a deal takes off between u.s. airways and american. what it means for consumers. troubled waters: insights on cruise stocks following carnival's rocky week. plus, does apple have a trick up its sleeve? traders give us their takes on wristwatch rumors. first business starts now. you're watching first business: financial news, analysis, and today's investment ideas. good morning. it's friday, february 15th. i'm angela miles. in today's first look: stocks stay stuck. stocks and comodities barely budged yesterday. a cross-current of postive news on jobs and m&a deals in the u.s. offset negative economic data out of europe, which held the market in check. shares of herblife soared 15% after hours on word carl ichan bought 14 million shares of the nutrition company. and tiffany is suing costco. tiffany claims the club chain is selling engagement rings bearing the tiffany name. traders will enjoy a long holiday weekend. with presidents' day coming up on monday, the markets will be closed. mark sebastian of option pit mentoring joins us on this friday for a closer look a
travel southwest to west early saturday morning local time by using binoculars or telescopes. nasa says asteroids of similar size have come as close once every 40 years and collide with the earth once every 1,200 years. >>> researchers in the united states believe north korea could be preparing a new missile launch in the wake of tuesday's nuclear test. their analysis is based on recent satellite photos of a launch site in the northeast of the country. researchers at johns hopkins university looked at images of the launch site in musendanri. they compared photos taken in january with shots from three months earlier. the photos show a crane pointing in a different direction. part of the launch pad has also been cleared of snow. the researchers say this activity could point to another missile test. the researchers also report that a new launch pad is being upgraded. they say it's been fitted with three large fuel tanks and a flame trench cover to protect large rockets from exhaust gases. they note the cover appears similar to the one used in iran indicating possible assistance from tehran
(instrumental music) >> for 63 years the u.s. has been part of the nato alliance, but is nato still an important safeguard for americans or is it simply a money pit? >> the nato relationship is enormously important to us. i think it was winston churchill said something to the affect that the only worst thing than, than going to war with allies is to go to war without allies. >> we're dealing with network global threats and if we don't provide a network global response we're always gonna to be on the back foot. >> what we need is not just nato on the conventional defense side, we need a nato alliance for economic statecraft. >> the problem is that it is an alliance that is largely sustained by american defense spending. (instrumental music) >> in a democracy, agreement is not essential, but participation is. >> never before in our history have we been so interconnected with the rest of the world. >> foreign policy is actually not foreign. >> america has faced great hardship before and each time we have risen to the challenge. >> the ultimate test is to move our society f
. >>> fueled by a weaker yen and strong sales of cameras in the u.s. >>> and shares in virgin media rally after an offer for a takeover that could value the uk cable operator at $20 billion. >> all right. welcome to tuesday. >> it's get together tuesday. coordinated, as well. >> the final print for the eurozone is finally come in, 48.6, a little better than the forecast of 48.2. >> may i just say, though, the employment index, look at that, 46.1, which is just barely better than the flash estimate but still the lowest since december 2009. on a downward trajectory. it's not germany where the final composite was 54.4. it's the periphery still. france's final january pmi falls to 46.1. >> france is where the concern is. we have francois hollande today speaking to the eu parliament. he's going to lay out his vision for the eu against that economic back drop. >> isn't it amazing? we come into the week yesterday with everyone still talking. you have that great barons cover, you come in, just get the risk trade massively off. and the question for today and the rest of the week is frankly whether that'
exercise with the u.s. navy. the drills are being conducted off of south korea's east coast. we have more from seoul. it is an exercise that has been months in the planning. -- >> it is an exercise that has been months in the planning. a third nuclear test could lead the us and south korea to plan for a preemptive strike against the north in the future to prevent a nuclear missile launch. >> the us will have a nuclear submarine around the korean coast. the nuclear power can be deployed to korea. if the us and korea want, they will pre-empt, attack preemptively any time. >> they released footage of the president being briefed by security staff. >> north korea should pay the price for its provocation. we will recommend sanctions with practical effect. >> what was interesting was the wording, an explicit promise to carry out direct actions against north korea as part of the sanctions, a little more than a week after north korea said it would take strong, physical countermeasures against the south if it did so. it is very publicly responding to that challenge. from beijing, north korea's trad
prohibiting the use of coffee and coca-cola -- cola in the world. this is a little over an hour as they discuss the invitation of its use worldwide. >> could please turn on that. thank you. we are going to be talking about coffee, and cola and the ingredients in cola. his latest book examines a series of highly addictive substances that have caused many deaths through much profit and how they make their way into the united states and what the u.s. government's role has been in ensuring that they come into this country. this evening, we are pleased to be joined by two drug policy experts as well. without further ado, i would like to hand it over to the panel. [applause] >> thank you so much for coming out here. i am so excited. it is great to be here in new york. i'm going to start off by talking about my book, and then we will go into what focuses this week and what is going on with the u.n. that basically prohibits this around the world. back in 2004 and 2005, i did a book about marijuana. it wasn't about how to smoke weed, but an educational book about how they might talk to t
in your home state. that is the way it used to work and we can make it work that way again. there are a number of things we have to do immediately. we may disagree on how to dress them but not the need for them to be addressed. each of you are making different decisions you are grappling with it. i do not think there is much much difference. i'm not mad a governor from the time of implementing the recovery act and on now who does not think we have to do something about our infrastructure. there is very little disagreement on the need too build an education that has such immense possibilities for our people. most of these issues were united by more than what divides us. these all intersect at a place where both the state and federal governments engage. we are going to have to work together. they overlap, in many cases. we will have our differences. we should all agree that the united states has to have the highest percentage of college graduates of any nation in the world. everyone disagrees. some of you governors have led the way an early education and the consequences for
it easy. >>> analysts at a u.s. cyber security firm are accusing the chinese military of spying on american corporations. they say one unit stole information from more than 100 companies. officials in the obama administration have their own concerns. analysts at virginia based firm released a report identifying the people's liberation army. they say members of one unit have attacked more than 140 organizations over the past seven years. they believe the hackers are based in shanghai. state department spokesperson said such attacks are threatening u.s. economic and national security interests. >> we've raised our concern at the highest level about cyber threats from china including the involvement of the military. >> china's defense ministry has dismissed the u.s. allegations as groundless. the state-run news agency quote ad defense ministry spokesperson as saying the military has never been involved in online espionage. he said china is a victim of cyber attacks because the ip addresses are often stolen and misused. many attacks come from the united states but china has never bl
exhaust gases. it appears similar to one used in iran indicating possible assistance from tehran. researchers estimate construction could be completed in 2016. they say it would enable north korea to launch rockets three to four times larger than previous versions. >>> north korean officials used the site to launch long range ballistic missiles in 2006 and 2009. >>> tens of thousands of north koreans have gathered together for a show of solidarity. scientists carried out an underground nuclear test earlier this week at the site in northeast. people marked the achievement at a rally in the capital. military officers and civilians gathered in a square in pyongyang. they listened to speeches from dig ani they listened to speeches from dig antarie dignitaries. north korean leader kim jong-un did not attend. the party secretary said that the test was a self-defense measure against u.s. hostility. he said if u.s. officials continue to increase pressure north koreans will respond with high level counter measures. another official threat is capable of attacking military basis on the u.s.
big earnings reports coming in. we're awaiting on hp and aig. the bank that used to be essentially owned by, you, the taxpayers. we'll bring you the numbers as soon as they are released. markets shaken up by the minutes released from the federal reserve yesterday. coming up, we have dick evans, chairman and ceo of cullen frost bankers, member of the advisory banker of the fed, and his bank didn't take a dime of t.a.r.p. money and was able to survive and grow without t.a.r.p. funds. what he says is hurting our economy and what we need to spark more growth. sandra: crocs ceo joining us first on stock business, a pop today, following earnings, find out what the foot ware company is doing to follow up a record setting 20 # 12. david, the shoes still sell like hot cakes. daifd -- david: they came back because of good management. we'll talk about that, but, first, what drove the markets today with the data download. a sea of red on wall street with all three ending lower the second day in a row. s&p in negative territory for the week, on track to snap the longest winning streak in more t
thought was good for us all. i am honored to be here with american enterprise institute and for me it's like coming to the mac and the promised land and certainly we recognize the great contributions that the american enterprise is given over many years in helping us with the development of policy and understanding of what's taking place particularly here in washington d. c., so thanks for the invitation to come here and speak. we are going to talk about health care today and from a utah perspective, my view of the world when it comes to health care. it's a complicated topic and it's certainly an important topic and i know health care has been on the lips of many, the watercooler topic that it may be. i have heard the story of the four country surgeons in utah talking about health care issue and they got into the conversation of who is the easiest person to operate on? and the one doctor says i can tell you the easiest people to operate on a really mathematicians. when asked why mathematicians come to when you open them up and take them apart all of their parts are numbered so it's ve
postevent features. and to get us started i want to reduce the mastermind of today's event, bernard curtis. burnet is, i learned today, one of four curators of photography in the prints and photographs division. i'm sure they are all here. it is my pleasure to turn it over to berna curtis. let's give her a and. -- in a hand. [applause] >> thank you very much, john. i have to say that we are all in this together. i'm not the mastermind. today, we have brigitte freed was the winner of the photographer whose work is featured in the book, "this is the day: the march on washington," which we are celebrating. and we have the distinguished dr. michael eric dyson, and we have paul farber. all of them here with us for a special kind of conversation, which is how we build this. i will tell you a little bit about each individual quickly. because time is of the essence. and i'd like to tell you that brigitte freed was formally brigitte pflueger, and she met leonard freed in rome in 1956. they married a year later in amsterdam where they lived, deciding to leave for life in the united states in 1963,
trouble negotiating steps. he started using the cane several months ago. >> reporter: in his announcement, the pope said, quote,"i have had to recognize my incapacity to adequately fulfill the ministry entrusted to me." pope benedict xvi has overseen a series of scandals and controversy, including the sex abuse crisis in the catholic church. his critics charge he was not progressive enough, upset he condemned gay marriage, the ordination of women, and allowing priests to marry. but supporters viewed him as a steadfast leader, and praised him for warning against the subtle influence of secularism. >> wendy: joining us now with thoughts on these developments, is dr. cornelius becker a professor at regent university. thank you so much for being on the program. >> it greats to be with you. >> wendy: it is so unusual for a pope to step down, almost unprecedented, cepts fo -- exempt for that one time 600 years ago. >> it is unprecedented. weren't we've had several popes that have resigned for the position, but never for the reason this pope has offered, frail health and advanced age. i think it
access like over here. i know this is hard to see with the light, the unite the will to use our copies that we have been back afterwards. .. they also would benefit from having their revenue source to do a lot more, so this is a wonderful that you can use. let's see, this is another prop that shows carbon energy efficiency spending relative to the carbon intensity that would show you might be spending a bit of money on energy efficiency but you have the carbon intensive energy sources in your state. what are the spaces that fall into that particular squadron, and that might be other candidates for energy efficiency programs. all right with. moving along. this is an example of how you have the comparison interface that the tool allows you to do. this is an interactive feature. so, for example, you hear that the epa is moving forward on greenhouse gases and that it's very receptive to the alternative means of achieving compliance. what would you want to do? with the market base things that you want to do? this particular tool would allow you to look at for example the benefits of
can tweet us. we have 35, is already on facebook. and you can always e-mail us at urnal@cspan.org legislators step up for paid sick leave. some pretty 9% of private-sector workers are not entitled to paid time off when they fall ill according to the bureau of labor statistics. low-wage and part-time workers, particularly those who work at small firms or who work in restaurants, are among the least likely to get paid sixth time. to change that, democratic lawmakers and their allies in maryland, washington, and massachusetts, and cities including new york, philadelphia, and portland, or try to advance measures that would make a sixth time a legal requirement for most firms. in congress, senator tom harkin plans to reintroduce a federal paid sick leave bill this spring. some employers contend the measure has harmed workers with company wage and increase -- which by prompting cuts in wages or increases. we are asking you about the federal government and if there should be a federal mandate when it comes to paid sick days. here is how you can reach out to us, on our phone lin
for a chance to apply for asylum in greece. >> we slept in the stores because the police came to look for us every day. >> world leaders deny there is a global currency war. are all the major powers secretly devaluing? inventors often are not rewarded. >> people who are supposed to run our innovation units treat me like dirt. >> when it comes to refugees and migrants, agrees is the front door of europe. at one point, 300 people a day were crossing greece's border with turkey illegally. on mass roundup was 70,000 people picked up off the streets in six months. these are the figures, but behind them, he minute stories. we have one man's account of his journeys through the system. this was the biggest textile factory in greece. today, it lies abandoned and is famous for something else. felt here a year ago, hundreds of migrants were squatting in the factory, desperate to get out of a greece. >> it does not feel like europe. this is no europe. >> my guide was this man. a moroccan living in the factory. place,en, as we left the i never expected to see him again. today, at the factory looks quiet,
. the u.s. trade gap narrows as the world buys more made in america products and the u.s. buys less foreign oil. >> susie: and with gas prices rising, chevy hopes its new diesel chevy cruze will attract buyers looking for more miles per gallon. >> tom: that and more tonight on "n.b.r." >> susie: millions of people are bracing tonight for a powerful snow storm that could cripple the east coast. some forecasters say this could be the blizzard of the century with record amounts of snow and extremely strong winds. in parts of the northeast, transportation was shut down. the governors of massachusetts and connecticut declared a state of emergency and banned car travel, train service and cancelled flights in and out of boston. while the worst of the storm has yet to hit, many businesses and cities were busy making preparations today. erika miller reports. >> reporter: this monstrous storm is already being compared to the great blizzard of '78, when vast amounts of snow blanketed the ohio valley and the great lakes. that storm lasted 36 hours, leaving cars stranded. this storm could also b
-free. use promo code: gethelp. if you're not completely satisfied, notify lifelock and you won't pay a cent. order now and also get this shredder to keep your documents out of the wrong hands-- a $29 dollar value, free. get protected now. call the number on your screen or go to lifelock.com to try lifelock protection risk free for a full 60 days. use promo code: gethelp. plus get this document shredder free-- but only if you act right now. call the number on your screen now! liz: good afternoon, everybody, iemg liz caman, stocks up across the board, trading near the best levels of the day. take a look. the dow jones industrials up 47 points, that s&p level now at 1529, up nine points,. nasdaq better by 16. the dow is now just about 1% away from its all-time closing high of 14164.53 back to october 9th of 2007. just before the launch week of fox business. it's been awhile. we'll see whether the bulls can turn it up a notch and make it interesting going into the close. in the meantime, though, while the blue chips get the attention, since the dow 30 has named people recognized, we want to poi
of the great depression. as the u.s. entered world war ii, how did a system of accounting become the key to building the american arsenal? by 1970, america was uncovering the negative effects of pollution. should we measure these hidden costs of economic growth? most of us decide how well we're doing economically by what we can afford to buy. can we calculate a nation's economic well-being by adding up those individual measurements? can we compare national figures over time to determine if our economy is making progress? u.s. economic growth-- what is the gross national product? with economic analyst richard gill, we'll explore that question on this edition of economics usa. i'm david schoumacher. these computer tapes at the bureau of economic analysis in washington document 50 years of america's economic growth. they provide access to the accounting system known as gnp. when the united states faced its worst economic crisis, the great depression, no such measuring tool existed, until this report went to the senate. copies of national income, 1929-1932 are scarce today, but back in 1934,
, one from the u.s., one from belgium, austria. the dominkan priest was there. i was sitting with father of the priests. and they are all seeking to try to lead the church. so because of that, i would meet every year for several days with the fathers. so i had the chance of spending a lot of time with them. >> there has been benefit to your knowing pope benedict xvi. outside of how you know him as teacher and scholar, what kind of man is he, as a regular guy. >> he was the big disciplinarian. we all knew that was false. so once he became pope, he was known to the world. so he is exactly like you see him and hear him right now as pope. he's wonderful. he's gracious. he's serene. he has a great sense of humor. it's kind of ironic sense of humor. i'll tell you one story. they are involved in the translation work. so we thought we would be able to publish it when it came out because other nations like france and germany published. but the u.s. bishops decided they would publish it themselves. i told that to him and he said, yes, the american
would have thought when some of us voted for just a common market all those years ago that the eu would now be interfering potentially and what benefits we should be paying two romanians and bulgarians before they have made any occupation to our society? is it any wonder people feel disillusioned and callous? but isn't the good news is, who is more likely to vote to give people a genuine choice of a referendum, a liberal or a conservative or eastland? >> well, i'm delighted by my honorable friend managed to slip the point in at the end. i won't urge any i will friends to make their way to support the reelection and the campaign. but the point, the point that he makes is very important, which is we need to look through every aspect of how we welcome people to our country, and make sure why we must to be fair, we must not be a soft touch. so i am making sure we look at our health service, we look at housing, we look at benefits. with that illegally, we look at all other things and make sure proper and tough controls of people who want to come and live here. >> the treasury was required to
forces on the high seas that created high tension. >>> u.s. transportation investigators say flawed battery design could be behind the problems of the 787 dreamliner as the manufacturer wins approval for test flights. >>> and a new type of bullet train is racing along the rails in japan. the latest has upgrades that enhance safety in the event of an earthquake. >>> i'm gene otani in tokyo. welcome to "newsline". japanese and chinese leaders are locked in a back and forth debate that appears to be going nowhere. china defense ministry issued a statement denying reports that they used fire-control radars in the east china sea. the statement refers to two separate incidents on january 19th. it admits crews on chinese frigate tracked a japanese helicopter because it approached their vessel. in the second case on january 30th the statement says a chinese ship monitored a destroyer that was following it at close range. but the statement denies chinese crews used fire-control radar in either instance pinpoint says officials in tokyo released false reports without confirming the facts with
important meetings of the year. shinzo abe is flying to washington for his first talks with u.s. president barack obama since he took office in december. their agenda is packed and their discussions are expected to touch on everything from a wide-ranging free trade deal to punishing north korea. >> translator: i want the summit talks to show the international community that japan and the united states have restored the strong bond of their alliance. >> abe says that alliance became unstable during the former democratic party-led administration. he says he's going to talk to obama about the u.s.-led negotiations for the transpacific partnership. nations that joined the discussions for the free trade agreement are supposed to in principle eliminate all tariffs, but abe doesn't want to abide by the precondition. abe and obama are expected to share ideas on what to do about north korea. scientists in the country last week carried out their third nuclear test. they are agreed to push for a nuclear resolution imposing new sanctions on pyongyang. >>> government officials say the prime minister wi
. south korean defense officials say air force troops from the two countries are conducting a drill using f-16 fighter jets. the pilots are preparing for possible aerial combat and air raids on north korea. south korean navy commanders say they are holding ameritime mobility exercise involving 20 naval ships. army officers say they are also planning to conduct a shelling drill this week. defense officials in seoul have somehowed off a key part of their military's fire power. they released video of the newly-deployed cruise missile. the 50-second clip shows the weapons hit targets after being fired from a destroyer and a submarine. >> translator: the military is releasing the footage to ease public anxiety by showing south korea is fully equipped to deal with the north korea's nuclear missile threats. >> reporter: the general said the missiles could hit targets in north korea, even small ones. the weapons could strike the country quickly if launched by submarines near the coast. while the military stays on alert, members of the national assembly are showing political resolve. they adopted
, former sec chairman harvey pitt telling us whether our concerns our government to bcould be using the agencies as political weapons. liz: the man who has led his fair share of american turnaround, ed whitaker, chairman and ceo of general motors and ran at&t will be here in the studio. talk about gm where he believes it is going to go. david: the first of the earnings report in just now. green mountain reported, what are the numbers? adam: $0.76 earnings per share, street expecting $0.65 on revenue of 1.34 billion. the street expecting 1.33 billion. they say the single cup brewing system is a breakthrough for the brokerage business with significant untapped potential in the u.s. and globally. he didn't report for how many of those units they sold in the last quarter. lizdavid: there are all kinds of indices which may explain why it is down slightly after hours. let's go to today's market action at the picks of the cme. our market panel in just a second. chief investment officer. but let's go to mark sebastian and put up those after our numbers if we can because we had a beat on gre
. >> and is steady as she goes, the u.s. economy is expected to keep up the recent trend of modesty of unspectacular job growth in january. >>> plus, the dutch finance minister warns of a worsening deficit this year, this after the government is forced to bail out local banks after a bailout of 3.7 million euros. >>> we kick off with the pmis out of the eurozone. january manufacturing pmi, 47.9. the flash 47.5, december manufacturing pmi was 46.1. it has boosted the euro to maintain its gaze, now back over to 1.3651 and continuing to climb high. that is now a 32-month high against the yen, as well, at 11.25965. the german manufacturing pmi was a little better, as well, this morning. helping to boost those numbers. we suggest that there's benefits from emerging markets rather than, perhaps, from elsewhere in europe. anyway, coming in better once again for the eurozone. still in contraction territory, but, of course, the trend is what is being concentrated on. we had similar indicators for two die verging views on china's recovery. eases to 50.4 for january, that was below the forecast of 5079 the. bu
pushing up fuel prices. those higher prices come as gasoline is also on the rise. joining us now with the outlook for energy, alan harry. he's portfolio manager and c.e.o. of the spartan commodity fund. alan, let me first start off by talking to you about home heating oil. we saw prices up this week 3%. what is the trend going forward? >> well, thank you for having me. what i look at right now is short term we're going up a little bit more. longer term we're heading down. two, three weeks we're going to go up just a little bit more. after that, down we go. >> susie: why is that? >> well, i think we're coming to the close of the heating season. we already have an idea of what days we have left of heating. and it's not using up enough. so they've kept a lot in reserve, a lot of speculation coming to the market, and it's not getting used up. two, three weeks we have a great idea of where we will sit heating season wise. after that, down we go displuz for most of the u.s., households use natural gas. they don't use heating oil. and the ones that do are mostly in the northeast. so com
societies, europe and elsewhere, though their rates of nonviolent crime and drug use are not that much different than ours. so if another country were to lock up its own people at the rate that we do, and if our rates of incarceration were more normative to the rest of the world, we would regard with that other country was doing as a massive violation of human rights. that's the way we would look at it. now, the other point here is what we're doing is not even consistent with american history. i mean, we had 500,000 people behind bars in 1980 and now we have 2.3 million, 2.4 million people behind bars and almost have 5,000 people behind bars just for a drug violation. there are as many people behind bars for a drug violation than we had for everything in 1980. it's not consistent with global standards and not consistent with our own history. it's costing a vast amount of money and i think what you see is for some of the d.a.'s and others are beginning to say enough is enough. we're seeing prison populations beginning to decline but when it comes down to the question,
from where it is to where it has never been. >> join us as we explore today's most critical global issues. join us for great decisions. >> great decisions is produced by the foreign policy association, inspiring americans to learn more about the world. sponsorship of great decisions is provided by credit suisse, eni, the hurford foundation, and pricewaterhousecoopers llp. >> coming up next, the intervention calculation. (instrumental music) >> historically the u.s. leaned heavily on strategic interventions to help counter the influence of communism. >> the reagan doctrine was a notion that we would support those that sought to oppose soviet domination. >> during the cold war there was a polarized world - there was the soviet union, there was the united states and a lot of our interventions were used to block the advance of communism, and so very ideological basis for our, our interventions. >> and the u.s. has long retained the power to intervene at will. >> the united states has the capability, military capability, the power, literally the sort of capability to get things done. in
enforcement here in california is in effect a war on crumbs instead of the often used phrase on drugs. how do you respond to his remarks? >> well, i think the first thing that we have to recognize is that the majority of people who are caught up in the criminal justice system and who are prosecuted for this type of offense for possession offenses and to some degree possession for sale offenses, the vast majority are indigent people and the vast majority of those indigent people are people of color. so what you have are two systems in place. you have a system where privileged white middle class people basically use drugs, college campuses, frat parties, not clubs, they use drug with impunity, they don't have to worry about being caught. then you have a system that comes down like a ton of bricks on indigent poor people and that's one of the reasons why i think this type of reform is a positive first step because if you aren't going to make drug possession illegal, at least make it a misdemeanor and not a felony. at least don't stigmatize and label an entire population of people as felons and p
council resolution. >> reporter: the u.s. ambassador to the u.n., susan rice, echoed the strong criticism. >> the actions of north korea are a threat to regional peace and security, international peace and security, and they are not acceptable. they will not be tolerated. and they will be met with north korea's increasing isolation and pressure under united nations sanctions. >> reporter: the security council was quick to condemn the test. it also responded quickly in december when north korea successfully launched a long-range missile. the test could bring north korea closer to developing a nuclear warhead that is small enough to be mounted on a missile. critics point out that the security council members feel that the threat of north korea's program is becoming more rea than ever before. >> so miki, what's next? will the security council adopt tougher sanctions against north korea? >> reporter: well, the u.s., along with south korea, australia, and european members are all for tougher sanctions. these may include tightening the noose on north korea's financial institutions and weapons t
morning with us. i'll see you at the top of the hour. "your bottom line" starts right now. >>> thanks. see you at the top of the hour. we're not in a recession. for many of you, it sure might feel like one. good morning, everyone. i'm christine romans. for a moment there it felt like things were turning around, stock market near all-time highs, housing market recovering and the economy adding jobs every month. now relief may have given way to a little bit of worry. here's why. it's starting to feel like a recession again, especially if you're living paycheck to paycheck, gas prices up nearly 50 cents in the past month. the fastest run-up, you're bringing homeless money, thanks to the expiration of the tax cut. you're getting about 60 bucks less every month. rents are rising, up 12 quarters in a row now. unemployment is still too high. if you were counting on an early tax refupd you have had to wait. because of the fiscal cliff fiasco, the irs did not start issuing refund checks until january 30th. a stretched consumer, a consumer who has no choice but to cut back. big companies you work fo
tomorrow. we like it. >> brian kelly? >> europe is not fixed. can you short it. >> that does it for us, catch fast at five tonight. tomorrow, broadcasting from goldman sachs and internet conference. thank you for talking real estate and markets with us today. follow me on twitter. poufr "power lunch" begins right now. >> the second half of your trading day begins now. >> iphone, ipod and ipad. but how about an iwatch. apple doing what it did to the cell phone. will it indeed be another game-changer? >>> us airways, expected to an announce their highly anticipated mer anticipated merger this week. >>> a down day for stocks but of course we've add big run. is it a pause, pull back or do we rally on? we will ask credit suisse's leader in private banking. >>> indicies are up. 18 stocks are down, led by home depot. but only by a fraction. down 1%. a move in that stock of just 1%, so in essence, sue, we are kind of hanging on in thereafter that big push through january. back to you. >> thank you, very much, simon. 5 lflt b a lot of big news in apple today. more opposition to dell's $24 billi
and u.s. airways would create the world's largest airline. we'll break down what it means for you, the traveler, trying to book your flights. all ahead unless breaking news changes everything on "studio b." we begin with a a fox urgent setback for thousands of passengers stranded on the broken down crowds cruise ship. the ship is at a standstill because of a broken towline. this after delay after delay, carnival originally said the ship would arrive this afternoon, then they pushed back the estimated ail arrival to tonight, close to midnight. now this. of course you know the 900-foot long vessel has been without power since sunday when a fire in the engine room knocked out most of the electricity. since then it's been, according to passengers, grim onboard. raw sewage reportedly flooding the hallways, no air conditioning. barely any working toilets. we're told passengers had to wait for hours for anything to eat or drink. folks have reportedly had to sleep on the deck. now it's about 43 degrees and very cold. until the recent stop, the tugboats were towing it from the gulf of mexi
joins us again this morning. steve, we actually finally start the meetings today. we've had comments out from the russian finance minister, as well. what's he saying? >> well, he's trying to get us back on track on to a growth agenda, which when you look back at what the agenda was a couple of meetings ago back in toronto in 2010, that was sorely missing. that was about harboring deficits and having firm targets. it hasn't really worked, has it? what they've said is our growth estimates were slightly optimistic. listening to what some of the policymakers are saying this time around, the likes of mario draghi, i'm scratching my head a little bit. there's some uncontentious stuff. i can live with that. range of financial market indicators showing situation normalizing. but what about this bit? currency chatter is inappropriate, fruitless and self-defeating. hang on a second, mr. draghi. it wasn't us, the journalists that started this. it was policymakers. it was the g- 7. it's incestble we're going to start rumbling about this. i can't help but thinking mr. draghi is missing the point here
attempts to prohibit the use of coffee and coca in the u.s. and around the world. mr. cortes describes secret deals made by top u.s. anti-drug official harry answer linger pushing to banco ca's use worldwide. this is a little over an hour. >> okay. um, and so tonight we are pleased to welcome ricardo cortes to discuss his latest book, "a secret history of coffee, coe that and cola: a tale of coffee, coca-cola, caffeine, secret formulas, special flavors, special favors and a future of prohibition." cortes is the creator and illustrator of a series of subversive books for all ages, for postally all ages about such things as marijuana, bombing and the jamaican bobsled team. his latest book examines a series of highly addictive substances that have caused many deaths and fueled much, much profit in this how they make their way into the u.s. and what the u.s. government's role has been in insuring that they come into this country, all right? and this evening we are pleased to be joined by two drug policy experts as well. its fellow sanho tree and colette that youngers. and without further a
have been under pressure. what we saw with u.s. airways, it was getting hit hard. warren buffett's company, berkshire hathaway, buying time out right here. they called it at 7250. >> yes, they just think it's a great product. he said he was absolutely going to be in for the long term. liz: it's not a classic equity deal where they shine it up. david: we just saw whole foods getting kicked today about 10%. >> that is not good news. david: as you can see, we have very big movements. do not be fooled when we see the dow jones down, the s&p 500 is up a little bit. less than a 10th of a percentage point, nasdaq, the biggest mover is the rest of 2000. it is the individual stocks, we have seen some big movements by individual stocks and we will be talking about coming up. liz: did you see the coal industry sector? lots of natural resources after the fourth-quarter earnings. all gaining more than 4%, 13 full percentage point. david: when you see that it is settling at the lowest level in six months, that is what gives people a lot of concern. it is just about at the 200 day moving averag
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